Decoding An Animal Testing Policy

All of us at some point have fallen into the trap of believing a brands animal testing policy without questioning it. Why should we have to decode and dig deep into an animal testing policy before getting the truth? Surely brands should be open and clear about things like this, you’d think the law would make it so. Unfortunately not.

The fact is, the laws around animal testing and advertising/transparency have A LOT of loopholes. If brands were required to tell us that they test on animals, do you think they’d make any money? Probably not.

When you ask a brand if they test on animals, they’ll probably come back with some talk about how its been banned in the EU and how they don’t believe in testing on animals. Most of us would have taken that as a solid, but unfortunately it sets off alarm bells.

So if you’re new to cruelty free products, I’m going to help you decode the policies and find out what they REALLY mean.

These are some examples of what brands might say in their animal testing policy or what they may say to you:

Seroquel ohne rezept What They Say:
“We are against animal testing”
Quetiapine ohne rezept What They *Could* Mean:
“We’re against it but we do it anyway”

http://restlessfeet.co/category/travelling/page/6?category_name=travelling What They Say:
“We don’t test on animals except when required by law”
What They Mean:
“We don’t test on animals where its illegal but we want more money so we’re gonna sell our products in countries where we legally have to test on animals, because more money”

What They Say:
“Our products are not tested on animals”
What They *Could* Mean:
“Our final products aren’t tested but the ingredients are”

What They Say:
“We don’t test on animals”
What They *Could* Mean:
“We get others to do it for us”

What They Say:
“*Brand Name* has never tested on animals”
What They *Could* Mean:
“We pay others to do it on our behalf”

What They Say:
“Animal testing has been banned in the EU”
What They Mean:
“So we get third parties to test outside the EU or use suppliers outside the EU who test”

There are the obvious ones for you, if a brand gets back to you and doesn’t clearly state the following then push for more answers.

Tests When Required By Law? Yes or No?
Uses A Third Party To Test On Their Behalf? Yes or No?
Uses Suppliers That Test On Animals? Yes or No?
Tests Ingredients On Animals? Yes or No?
Tests Final Products On Animals? Yes or No?

Don’t be afraid to keep asking until you literally get a yes or a no, if it’s not a clear no and it’s a long winded explanation that seems kind of irrelevant to your question then they’re probably trying to dodge the question/avoid admitting they do test on animals.

Before emailing a brand yourself or trying to decode their animal testing policy check these reliable sources to save you the time and effort:

Logical Harmony
Leaping Bunny
Choose Cruelty Free
 

PETA is another one however I have found some of their products to be PETA approved but not actually cruelty free according to the lists above. PETA have a much more relaxed process when allowing a brand to be PETA approved therefore I try and always use the top 3 before accepting PETA immediately.

If you’re still wondering how you can tell if a brand is cruelty free then take a look at my post on How To Tell If A Brand Is Cruelty Free and that should answer a few more questions you may have.

Stay smart x

2 thoughts on “Decoding An Animal Testing Policy”

  1. Absolutely LOVED this post. It’s so helpful as I find so many beauty products nowadays are so deceiving with their labeling, so your tips are really helpful and I will definitely be using them in the future! 🙂

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